My Happiness Project: Cats

Somehow I befriend cats anywhere. This was in Turkey.

Today I did two things: finished reading The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin and finally had the chance to go to the volunteer info session at the San Francisco SPCA.

I highly recommend The Happiness Project as a person who does not believe in the traditional self-help books. I think they’re full of really generic ideas since they have to appeal to the masses. This book is different. It is practical and realistic.

Similar to Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert which is also a favorite of mine, the book is about a chronicle of a woman trying to be happier within a year. Not everyone can afford trips around the world or be offered to do it for work like Elizabeth. In Gretchen’s own words, she set out to change her life without “really” changing her life. Using philosophies and advice from famed authors, historical figures, friends, and more, Gretchen examined how we can aim to accomplish every day happiness in an empirical manner, complete with charts and lists of resolutions.

I won’t ruin the book for you but here are the key takeaways that echo with me (some are direct quotes while others are paraphrasing):

  • What you do every day matters more than what you do once in a while
  • Enjoy the process, and be in the present.
  • You can choose what you do, but you can’t choose what you like to do.
  • It takes work to be happy, but it’s totally worth the effort.
  • You’re the sole person most influential to your level of happiness.

Some people may think that trying to make yourself happier is not a very noble goal, and Gretchen addresses this issue, too. Happiness is an marvelous cycle and it’s highly contagious. Two examples: One of the best ways to make yourself happy is to make other people happy. AND the reverse is also true- the best way to make those around you happy is to be happy yourself. In addition, happier people help others more whether through volunteering or making donations, or something else.

No I’m not depressed or anything, but can’t we all be even happier? A piano master still practices every day even after she wins awards. Lastly, you shouldn’t wait for when terrible things happen to learn about trying to be happier. Knowing what makes you happy and how to do it is like insurance for when things get bad.

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